Monthly Archives: January 2018

Wicked-Strong Storm

Wicked-strong storm coming from the North Sea recently slammed into the Netherlands, tearing off roofs, flipping trucks, tipping stacks of empty shipping containers, blowing pedestrians in the street, and prompting flight cancellations and havoc at the airports.

In the Hague, we witnessed even big tall trees being literally uprooted in our way to attend the morning session of training at the Clingendael.

(An excerpt of the forthcoming travelogue, “Hugging the Hague: Winter Stint at the Netherlands Institute of International Relations,” Mansoor Limba (Amazon.com, 2018.)

     

     

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Sinbad – The Hero or the Villain?

As in other negotiation and mediation trainings, the first case introduced to us 20 trainees from 13 Asian, African and Central/South American countries is the controversial “Crocodile River Story”:

“Once there lived a woman named Abigail who was in love with a man named Greg. Greg lived on the opposite side of a crocodile-infested river. Abigail wanted to cross the river to be with Greg, but the bridge had been washed out by a heavy flood the previous week. So she went to ask Sinbad, a riverboat captain, to take her across. He said he would be glad to if she would consent to go to bed with him before the trip. She refused and went to a friend named Ivan to explain her plight. Ivan did not want to get involved at all in the situation. Abigail felt her only alternative was to accept Sinbad’s terms. After she had been to bed with him, Sinbad fulfilled his promise and delivered her across the river to Greg. When she told Greg about her amorous adventure, Greg cast her aside with disdain. Heartsick and rejected, she turned to Slug with her story. Slug, feeling compassion for her, sought out Greg and beat him brutally. Abigail was overjoyed at the sight of Greg getting his due. As the sun set on the horizon, people heard Abigail laughing at Greg.”

Each of us was instructed to rank the characters in the story from 1 (who you think is ‘best’) to 5 (who you think is ‘worst’). Then we were divided into small groups with three or four members each, and each group was asked to come up with a common ranking. Thereafter, members of each group were asked to select their group representative to negotiate with the representatives of other groups to come up with a common ranking.

I’m sure, you can now expect the outcome of the exercise:

For the subgroup where I belonged, three of us agreed on ranking Sinbad as the number 1 (‘the best’) on the basis of rational choice theory and material cost-benefit analysis, but one us firmly stood his ground of ranking Sinbad as the number 5 (‘the worst’). In the end, we failed to agree on a single ranking.

And the same disagreement was the outcome of the representatives’ long, emotionally-charged negotiation.

     

What is your take?

Is Sinbad the best, or the worst?

Tips:
1. Before negotiating with the other parties, the criterion/criteria must be clarified upon. Technically, it is called “Rules and Procedures.”
2. Nothing is agreed upon unless something is agreed upon.

(An excerpt of the forthcoming travelogue, “Hugging the Hague: Winter Stint at the Netherlands Institute of International Relations,” Mansoor Limba (Amazon.com, 2018.)

Categories: Seminars, Trainings, and Conferences, Travel | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Back to School Again

One lazy afternoon, I received an email from a friend who shared a link and asked me if I’m interested to apply for a UNDP-sponsored short course on negotiation and mediation as an instrument of conflict resolution being regularly conducted by the Clingendael Institute (the Netherlands Institute of International Relations).

Naturally, I said resoundingly, “Yes!”

So I immediately filled up the online form for about an hour and then clicked “Submit”!

Hopeful to be accepted, but not necessarily expecting.

Two weeks after, I received an email of my application’s acceptance.

Back to school again.

This time, in the Hague. In the Clingendael.

Tips:
1. Knowing a hyperlink is one thing; clicking it is another.
2. In applying for a fellowship, be always hopeful, though not necessarily expecting.
3. There’s no harm in actually submitting an online application even if you are not sure of being accepted. Who knows, you will have your luck!

(An excerpt of the forthcoming travelogue, “Hugging the Hague: Winter Stint at the Netherlands Institute of International Relations,” Mansoor Limba (Amazon.com, 2018.)

     

     

 

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Forthcoming Book – “Hugging the Hague”

HUGGING THE HAGUE: Winter Stint at the Netherlands Institute of International Relations. Mansoor Limba (Amazon.com, 2018).

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Rebooting on Federalism, BBL, and Violent Extremism

In the recent rebooting workshop on federalism, Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL) and violent extremism, instead of the usual ‘what-is-and-what-is-not’ presentation, I just shared to the participants my personal observation of the ruling PDP-Laban party’s federalism movement, the current status of the BBL in the Congress, and the inclusion of preventing and countering violent extremism (PCVE) in the Masa Masid program of the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG).

Thank you, DILG-Maguindanao Province, for the invitation and opportunity to share personal thoughts!

       

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Retiring is Re-tyring

Just last December, I was invited to speak about the concept of ‘reinvention’ in political philosophy at a training-workshop for media practitioners. I was really honored to meet again one of my mentors who happened to be a fellow speaker. As I never saw her after sometime, I ventured to ask, “Ma’am, are you retired now?” She replied cogently, “I didn’t retire; I just re-tyre – T-Y-R-E. And I will never retire!”

That short answer of my mentor turned into a subject of reflection of mine that night at the training venue which is a mountainous garden resort.

Yes, I realized then that any lover of knowledge and imparting knowledge never retires. He or she incessantly sips the nectar of learning and most graciously share the same to others. The lover is not only a candle – in fact, a sparkle of light; a kindler of fire.

The more frequent the lover is invited in the feast of education and teaching, the more he or she becomes hungry and thirty.

In other words, retirement is just a unique time for re-tyring; yes, you may say it’s a moment of re-tooling and reinvention.

In conclusion, the lover never retires as he or she knows no retirement in this arena of pen, paper and speaking. For the lover, the only retirement is the ultimate reunion with the Beloved and that Beloved is the Fountainhead of knowledge, learning, and wisdom.

Ma’am Dans is indeed such a LOVER.

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