Posts Tagged With: education

Retiring is Re-tyring

Just last December, I was invited to speak about the concept of ‘reinvention’ in political philosophy at a training-workshop for media practitioners. I was really honored to meet again one of my mentors who happened to be a fellow speaker. As I never saw her after sometime, I ventured to ask, “Ma’am, are you retired now?” She replied cogently, “I didn’t retire; I just re-tyre – T-Y-R-E. And I will never retire!”

That short answer of my mentor turned into a subject of reflection of mine that night at the training venue which is a mountainous garden resort.

Yes, I realized then that any lover of knowledge and imparting knowledge never retires. He or she incessantly sips the nectar of learning and most graciously share the same to others. The lover is not only a candle – in fact, a sparkle of light; a kindler of fire.

The more frequent the lover is invited in the feast of education and teaching, the more he or she becomes hungry and thirty.

In other words, retirement is just a unique time for re-tyring; yes, you may say it’s a moment of re-tooling and reinvention.

In conclusion, the lover never retires as he or she knows no retirement in this arena of pen, paper and speaking. For the lover, the only retirement is the ultimate reunion with the Beloved and that Beloved is the Fountainhead of knowledge, learning, and wisdom.

Ma’am Dans is indeed such a LOVER.

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To Kindle Fire

“Today, it is also considered a defect for a teacher to think his or her goal is only to supply the mind of the student with pieces of information, facts, and formulas, and to make it like a pool which is filled with a certain amount of water. The goal of teaching must be higher and that is to train and grant independence to the mental faculty of the learner and revitalize his power of innovation. That is, the teacher’s job is actually to kindle fire.” ~ Murtada Mutahhari (1920-79)

Murtada Mutahhari, “Training and Education in Islam,” trans. Mansoor Limba (IHCS, 2011), http://mlimba.com/portfolio

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Quotes from “Visualize Your Destination!”

The following are quotes from “Visualize Your Destination!” – a recently delivered commencement exercises message of inspiration:

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Lessons from the Tunnel’s Tale

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Exactly two days after posting “Retelling Tale of a Long Tunnel,” an FB friend sent me this private message: “Thanks for this post. It’s actually a wakeup call for me. J I’m still stuck up with my research proposal. With all these office works, I doubt if I could finish my master’s. Any piece of advice?”

Late night of the same day, I received another message from a Caribbean friend informing me, thus: “Salam. I’m now in my first semester of PhD. Any tips about writing dissertation?” And then just yesterday, an ‘online’ buddy and an ‘offline’ student at the same time told me as we bumped on each other in a nearby 7-Eleven convenient store: “Sir, we will appreciate if you could share some personal reflections on pursuing graduate studies.”

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Retelling Tale of a Long Tunnel

Tunnel

This month of March brings a particular mirth and joy as we read in FB posts some friends finishing their graduate and post-graduate studies – not to mention the many graduation photos of FB friends’ elementary and high school kids.

With such feeling, I can’t help but retell my own tale of a long tunnel with the intention of sharing personal reflections and identifying moral lessons that may guide others before experiencing the same; hence, this marginalia…

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Categories: Education, International Relations | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Forthcoming Publication: “Fitrah: Man’s Natural Disposition”

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Murtada Mutahhari, FITRAH: MAN’S NATURAL DISPOSITION, trans. Mansoor Limba (London: MIU Press, forthcoming), 192 pp.

Its English translation is finished just today, al-hamdulillah.

It is expected to be published within this year or early next year, insha’ Allah.

About the Book:

“Fitrah: Man’s Natural Disposition” is a translation of the Persian book “Fitrat” (Tehran: Sadra Publications, 2006) by the great Muslim thinker and reformer, Ayatollah Murtada Muttahari. “Fitrah” is the theme of a 10-session lecture series given the martyred thinker in 1976-77 in the presence of teachers in Nikan School in Tehran, and apparently due to his involvement in the Islamic movement and his increasing social activities, it was not continued. With ample citations from the Qur’an and other traditional Islamic sources, Mutahhari discusses the concept of ‘fitrah’ or man’s natural disposition. The author does not confine himself to Islamic references as he continuously engages with the views of a wide range of philosophers including Plato, William James, Russell, Nietzsche, Marx, Feuerbach, Auguste Comte, Spencer, Will Durant, and Durkheim, among others. Mutahhari’s ontological discussion covers a range of issues, including the literal and technical meaning of ‘fitrah’, sacred inclinations, love and worship, and the evolution of human originality. He also examines materialism and provides a theistic approach to some issues pertaining to the theories on the origin of religion, evolution of human society, intrinsic and acquired guidance, and intuitive and sensory dispositions.

Murtada Mutahhari was a leading theoretician of the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran. As an accomplished scholar of Islamic sciences, he played a pivotal role in forming the modern Islamic discourse which served as the foundation of the revolution. With close to ninety works to his credit, he is considered one of the leading thinkers of the global Islamic movement in the twentieth century.

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