Posts Tagged With: training

Sinbad – The Hero or the Villain?

As in other negotiation and mediation trainings, the first case introduced to us 20 trainees from 13 Asian, African and Central/South American countries is the controversial “Crocodile River Story”:

“Once there lived a woman named Abigail who was in love with a man named Greg. Greg lived on the opposite side of a crocodile-infested river. Abigail wanted to cross the river to be with Greg, but the bridge had been washed out by a heavy flood the previous week. So she went to ask Sinbad, a riverboat captain, to take her across. He said he would be glad to if she would consent to go to bed with him before the trip. She refused and went to a friend named Ivan to explain her plight. Ivan did not want to get involved at all in the situation. Abigail felt her only alternative was to accept Sinbad’s terms. After she had been to bed with him, Sinbad fulfilled his promise and delivered her across the river to Greg. When she told Greg about her amorous adventure, Greg cast her aside with disdain. Heartsick and rejected, she turned to Slug with her story. Slug, feeling compassion for her, sought out Greg and beat him brutally. Abigail was overjoyed at the sight of Greg getting his due. As the sun set on the horizon, people heard Abigail laughing at Greg.”

Each of us was instructed to rank the characters in the story from 1 (who you think is ‘best’) to 5 (who you think is ‘worst’). Then we were divided into small groups with three or four members each, and each group was asked to come up with a common ranking. Thereafter, members of each group were asked to select their group representative to negotiate with the representatives of other groups to come up with a common ranking.

I’m sure, you can now expect the outcome of the exercise:

For the subgroup where I belonged, three of us agreed on ranking Sinbad as the number 1 (‘the best’) on the basis of rational choice theory and material cost-benefit analysis, but one us firmly stood his ground of ranking Sinbad as the number 5 (‘the worst’). In the end, we failed to agree on a single ranking.

And the same disagreement was the outcome of the representatives’ long, emotionally-charged negotiation.

     

What is your take?

Is Sinbad the best, or the worst?

Tips:
1. Before negotiating with the other parties, the criterion/criteria must be clarified upon. Technically, it is called “Rules and Procedures.”
2. Nothing is agreed upon unless something is agreed upon.

(An excerpt of the forthcoming travelogue, “Hugging the Hague: Winter Stint at the Netherlands Institute of International Relations,” Mansoor Limba (Amazon.com, 2018.)

Categories: Seminars, Trainings, and Conferences, Travel | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

To Kindle Fire

“Today, it is also considered a defect for a teacher to think his or her goal is only to supply the mind of the student with pieces of information, facts, and formulas, and to make it like a pool which is filled with a certain amount of water. The goal of teaching must be higher and that is to train and grant independence to the mental faculty of the learner and revitalize his power of innovation. That is, the teacher’s job is actually to kindle fire.” ~ Murtada Mutahhari (1920-79)

Murtada Mutahhari, “Training and Education in Islam,” trans. Mansoor Limba (IHCS, 2011), http://mlimba.com/portfolio

Categories: Education | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Meet Maya

Meet our new friend, Maya. She is the grade 3 daughter of Prof. Jianrong Chen, the Founder and Executive Director of Jinan University’s Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies, which hosted and organized last month the China-Asia Peace and Leadership Training Workshop at Jinan University, Guangzhou, China.

Brought up in Asian values of respecting elders, Maya would not just settle with calling us workshop participants as “uncle” or “aunt”. She would rather call us“granduncle” or “grandaunt”!

The first ‘victim’ of this appellation was no other than ‘Granduncle’ Kriya Langputeh during last year’s workshop when Maya met him for the first time. Next year, it would be nice to hear her calling him ‘Great-granduncle’!

Maya is the youngest peace-builder in the group. She is a photographer, an English interlocutor, a Tai Chi practitioner, a drawing artist, and a workshop facilitator.

As we finished our last dinner after the workshop’s closing program, I taught her the ‘magic’ of putting a piece of paper at my back neck and pulling it out from my mouth.

Thereafter I returned to the hotel at dust amidst a heavy downpour.

As I was folding my umbrella in my hotel room and recalling how happy Maya was for knowing the ‘magic,’ I couldn’t help but wish – “How I wish this umbrella would turn into a magic wand for world peace that Maya and her generation would truly enjoy!”

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Tougher to Negotiate With

The second module we had studied during the Asia-China Peace and Leadership Training-Workshop (Jinan University, Guangzhou, China, July 14-23, 2017) was about International Negotiation and Conflict Resolution, and for this two-day module, we were lucky enough to have PROF. GUY OLIVIER FAURE as our facilitator or resource person.

Dr. Faure is currently a Visiting Professor at CEIBS, Shanghai, China; Professor of Sociology Emeritus, Sorbonne University, Paris; and Director of International Conflict Resolution Center, The Hague, Netherlands.

Having done extensive works in international negotiations and conflict resolution, particularly in the domains of Long-term Strategic Forecast, Terrorism, and Business Security, Prof. Faure has lectured in a number of renowned universities and institutions including the Harvard Law School and the New York University.

He has authored, co-authored and edited 19 books and over a hundred articles, and one of those books is entitled “Negotiating with Terrorists: Strategy, Tactics and Politics” (Routledge, 2008).

During the second and last day of the module, as the time for lunch was approaching and everybody seemed to be already imagining to hold a spoon, instead of ballpen, I posed a question:

“Sir Olivier, taking into consideration your wide array of experiences in negotiation, both as a theoretician and a practitioner, which do you think is tougher to negotiate with: the ISIS, or MISIS (“wife” or “madame” in Filipino)?

After an unprecedented laughter, Sir Olivier retorted, “Of course, it’s the MISIS because they personally know our soft spot!”

How I wish, Sir Olivier’s next book project will be entitled, “Negotiating with MISIS: Strategy, Tactics and Politics.”

Categories: Education, Social Issues | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Light Moments in Vienna” Published Today!

LightMomentsinVienna

Published today!

Mansoor Limba, “Light Moments in Vienna” (Smashwords and Amazon, 2017), $2.99.

Published in both Smashwords.com andAmazon.com platforms, the book contains selected anecdotes of my personal experience while undergoing KAICIID fellowship training in interreligious and intercultural dialogue in Vienna, Austria.

Get you copy now and be part of that journey!

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/703292

www.amazon.com/author/mansoorlimba

 

Categories: Interfaith and Intra-faith Dialogue | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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